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Kevin Regan

Kevin Regan, Ninfield, East Sussex

Below are all messages posted from Kevin Regan ...

The Ashbys

14th October 2017

Kevin Regan:

Yes, Sir James retired to Ninfield.
This is the info I have for him
Ashby, Sir James William Murray RN KCB (1902) CB (1857). Magistrate for Sussex, Battle Division. Born 25 August 1822, son of Captain W R Ashby, RN. Married 1873 Catherine, daughter of the late F F Magenis. Educated RN School, Camberwell. Entered Navy 1839, retired 1878. Served at the taking of Bomarsund, Kertch and Sebastopol, 1854; China 1859-62. Was Secretary tp Sir George Seymore; Sir James Hope; Sir Houston Stewart; Sir Charles Freemantle; Sir Rodney Mundy and Admiral George Elliott. Decoratedfor General Service. Address: Little Park, Ninfield, Battle, Sussex. Club: Junior Conservatives. Died 21 October 1911.
1902 Coronation Honours
Knights Commander of the Order of the Bath (KCB) Military Division
Paymaster-in-Chief James William Murray Ashby, CB (Retired)
Name: Sir James William Murray Ashby R.N. K.C.B.
Sir James (comptroller of the Navy) Address: Little Park, Ninfield.
Notes: Sir JAMES WILLIAM MURRAY ASHBY, R. N. , K. C. B. , Deceased: Pursuant to 22 and 23 Viet. , cap. 35. NOTICE is hereby given, that all persons having any claims or demands' against the estate of Sir James William Murray Ashby, R. N. , K. C. B. , late of Little Park, Ninfield, in the county of Sussex, deceased (who died on the 21st day of October, 1911, and whose will, with a codicil thereto, was proved by Julie Ellen Ashby, the sole executrix, on the 24th day of November last, in the Principal Probate Registry), are hereby required to send particulars, in writing, of such claims or demands to us, the undersigned, on or before the 15th day of January next, after which date the executrix will proceed to distribute the assets amongst the persons entitled thereto, having regard only to the claims and demands of which she shall then have had notice; and the said executrix will not be liable for the assets of the said Sir J. W. M. Ashby, deceased, or any part thereof, so distributed, to any person or persons of whose claims or demands she shall not then have had notice. —Dated this fifteenth day of December, 1911. LANGHAM, SON and DOUGLAS, 44A, Robertson-street, Hastings, and at 10, New-court, Lincoln's Inn, London, W. C. , Solicitors to the Executrix.

The Second Anglo-Chinese War ("Opium war") of 1856 - 1860. The storming of the Taku Forts.
Rear-Admiral Hope, in his dispatch, mentioned with commendation Capts. C. F. A. Shadwell, N. Vansittart, and George Ommanney Willes; Commanders John Edmund Commerell, William Andrew James Heath, and Armine Wodehouse; Lieuts. John Jenkins, Robert James Wynniatt, Arthur John Innes, George Dacres Bevan, William Henry Jones, Charles John Balfour, George Doherty Broad, Herbert Price Knevitt, George Parsons, and John Crawford Wilson; Master William Donaldson Strong; Mates Claude Edward Buckle, George Spotswood Peard, Frederick Edward Gould, and Visct. Kilcoursie; Mids. G. Armytage and Charles Lister Oxley; Paymaster and Secretary James William Murray Ashby; Asst.-Paymaster John St. John Wagstaffe ; Second-Master Oscar Samson; Staff-Surg. Walter Dickson (2) M.D.; Surg. John Little, M.B.; Asst.-Surg. William James Baird, M.D.; Lieut.-Col. Thomas Lemon, R.M., Capts. (R.M.) Richard Parke, W. G. R. Masters, and Ponsonby May Carew Croker; Lieuts. (R.M.) Langham Rokeby, John Frederick Hawkey, Harry Lewis Evans, and John Straghan; Sergt.-Maj. Woon, R.M., Q.M. Sergt. Hailing, R.M.; Major Fisher, R.E., and Lieuts. (R.E.) J. M. Maitland and G. Longley.

As this hotly contested action resulted in a defeat, those who participated in it were never directly rewarded by the issue of medals or clasps, the granting of honours, or promotion; yet it must be admitted that, as, indeed, the exceedingly heavy loss indicates, officers and men behaved in a manner which added distinctly to the glories of the Navy, and which could have been scarcely more creditable had victory rewarded their efforts. The attack failed, firstly, because the narrowness of the channel, and the artificial obstructions crippled the usefulness of the ships, and, secondly, because the assault, a frontal one, was made over most difficult ground against works which were supposed, but wrongly supposed, to have been silenced; and was attempted with insufficient force. It must also be admitted that, as usual, the British were very ignorant of the exact strength and dispositions of the enemy.

Awaiting updates from our History Group if any more local knowledge available - apart from being a church warden at St May's for many years.
If you could add your family knowledge to ours then I'm sure it would be much appreciated.
You can contact Ninfield Local History Group via their website, if you don't want to add it here.

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The Ashbys

13th October 2017

Kevin Regan:

Hello, our Ninfield Local History Group does have some info, but we could always do with more!

Have you seen this, and do you know of Georgina?

http://hooe.east-sussex.co.uk/message-board/44/ashburnham-family-of-hooe/

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Whiteman Family

22nd November 2016 / Posted on Rye message board

Kevin Regan:

It's rather a broad title and perhaps Admin might consider splitting into the respective main family Names.

This is in regard to Albert Percy Whiteman, who is commemorated by Rye RBL in the Book of Remembrance. This is whay I provided them, and Paul, but may be of interest to other Whiteman researchers. Please add anything else tou know.
WHITEMAN, ALBERT PERCY. Rank: Leading Aircraftman. Service No: 334948.
Date of Death: 28/05/1940. Age: 42. Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force.
Panel Reference: Panel 24. Memorial: RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL
Additional Information: Son of Mr. and Mrs. G. Whiteman, of Broad Oak, Rye, Sussex; husband of Edna May Whiteman, of Hastings, Sussex.

One of 32 RAF aircraftmen who drowned on "SS Abukir" (694 tons) when it was sunk by an E boat 8 miles off Ostend. The Egyptian ship Abukir operated by the Khedivial Mail Line (KML) came under British flag early in the Second World War and was managed by the General Steam Navigation Co. She was torpedoed and sunk by the German motor torpedo boat S-34 on May 28th, 1940, in the North Sea.
On the night of May 28 to 29 the Abukir left Ostend where it had evacuated 210 British troops and RAF servicemen, and an unknown number of Belgian Air Force personnel and British nuns from a convent near Brugges to cross to England. It was sunk by the Schnellboot S-34 under the command of Oblt.zur See Obermaier.
The attack began a few miles off the WESTHINDER buoy, three torpedoes were fired by the Schnellboot which missed the Abukir, but the 4th struck and she sank in a few minutes. There were only 32 survivors including the captain (R M Wolfenden) and two nuns rescued by HMS Jaguar, Codrington, Javelin and Grenade (sunk next day at Dunkirk Harbour whilst evacuating more BEF troops) after some 7 hours in the sea.

S34 was sunk in the Mediterranean on 17 May 1942 when a direct hit from the Malta batteries at Fort St Leonard forced the crew to abandon her and an Me109 was called to sink her to prevent her falling into Allied hands.
Leading Aircraftsman Albert Percy Whiteman Service No: 334948 was the son of Mr and Mrs G Whiteman of Broad Oak and the husband of Edna May Whiteman, of Hastings, Sussex. He died as a result of the torpedoing of the SS Abukir (NOT HMS Aboukir, an elderly WW1 cruiser).

He was 42 years old and a member of No 3 Military and Air Mission. It had its origins in the No 3 British Air Mission in France in 1939. It moved to Belgium and was attached to the Belgian Army General Staff. Its role was to report back information about the Allies forward positions to the RAF Advanced Air Striking Force in France and Belgium. It therefore was able to pinpoint the changing locations of the Allied and enemy forces to enable accurate bombing to slow up any enemy advance and to hit where needed most.

In November 1939, Lt Col George Frederick (Hoppy) Hopkinson was sent as the head military advisor to the Belgian General Staff. He then instituted a change in the reporting systemto focus upon greater use of wireless communications and mobility to provide "real-time" assessments from the front line. The collective code name for these missions was "Phantom".

It is likely that Albert was selected at that time as by December 1939 he was in France. He was qualified as a driver (motor transport).

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Rye Memorial - James Walter Mesher

9th February 2016 / Posted on Rye message board

Kevin Regan:

I haven't been back here for some time as you can see, but this is the info available from Rye RBL WW1 Roll of Honour site for James Mesher..
MESHER, JAMES WALTER. Rank: Gunner. Service No: 32291. Age: 25.
Date of Death: 08/05/1915. Service: Royal Garrison Artillery. 122nd Heavy Bty.

Panel Reference: Panel 9. Memorial: YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL
Additional Information: Son of James and Martha Annie Mesher, of The Reading Room, Rye Harbour, Rye, Sussex. (On Casualty Form it looks like Stonework Cottages(?) Rye Harbour).
His Service Papers survive, showing he enlisted on 9th February 1910 at the age of 20. Civil occupation: general labourer.

He was trained at Sheerness in No. 18 Company then on 20 January 1914 he was posted to No. 66 Company in Jamaica, but by 7th October 1914 he was at Fort Nelson, receiving 3 days Confined To Barracks punishment for being absent for one hour – a trifle harsh, but there was a War on! On 17th October 1914 he was posted to 122 Heavy Brigade in France. Possibly Walter slipped out to phone or post a letter to his parents telling them of his posting abroad.

His character was assessed as intelligent and hardworking, with experience of fishing and small boats, gardener, etc.

On 29th May, the Rye Harbour vicar, F G Rochefort-Wade wrote on behalf of the family that they had received a report on 22nd May that Gunner Mesher had been wounded on 9th May, “and all the qualifying adverbs “Dangerously”, “Severely” and “Slightly” had all been crossed out, and requesting more news. The War Office replied that it had no further particulars at that time. Even by 28th June with further correspondence from the vicar, no certain information was known but he had appeared on Casualty List 21508 as “wounded” on 9th May.
The vicar even wrote letters to senior officers in France, and was himself informed by Major Haig commanding 122 Heavy Brigade that “Gunner Mesher died of wounds on 8th May on his way to a Dressing Station. Even then the vicar did not want to break such bad news without official confirmation, as his mother was in delicate health. He had a younger brother, Albert Ernest Mesher.

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SS Abukir 1940

8th August 2015

Kevin Regan:

With reference to enquiries regarding both Albert Percy Whiteman and Victor Davey, I believe I may have some helpful information for you both.

From further internet research, I can definit6ely confirm that Albert Percy Whiteman was a member of No 3 British Air Mission to Belgium. He is identified as being aboard the SS Aboukir when it was sunk by S34 and many of the survivors of the torpedoing were subsequently machine gunned where seen in the water using its searchlights. Only some 33 or so were rescued, mainly by the destroyer HMS Codrington some 6 hours later at daybreak.
Naturally there is a deal of confusion as very little of any passenger manifest survives, but the presence of other Army and particularly RASC casualties could support the contention that Victor Davey was also aboard.
The Army used the date of 27th May for Abukir casualties, even though the vessel was lost in the early hours of the 28th May. Bodies were washed ashore in the UK as well as France, Belgian and the Friesian Islands. However, I haven't yet found anything definitive to him actually being aboard Abukir rather than one of the 220 plus vessels sunk during the Dunkirk evacuation. He could therefore have been on another vessel unless we can discover why he was linked to Abukir.
I believe you both have my email address, so please respond via that if you have anything further.
Regards, Kevin

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James Osborne

8th December 2014

Kevin Regan:

Peter,

I hope you get this message but want you to know there is a proposed development on part of Ingrams Farm. Have you any paintings that are of the Ingrams Farm area as these would be of interest in the village.
You can contact me through Ninfieldactiongroup facebook page.

Christmas greetings!

Kevin

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James Burr

21st January 2014 / Posted on Rye message board

Kevin Regan:

Thanks very much! Now I have to find the link between Ponders End and Rye, but it's a great step forward, much appreciated!

Thursday 10 June. North Sea
Two torpedo boats, ex Insect-class coastal destroyers, 400t, 1907, 26 kts, 2 x 12pdr/ 3-18in tt, 35 crew, serving with Nore Local Defence Flotilla. Sailed from Harwich at midnight on the 9th, on patrol off Thames estuary, searching for reported submarines with three other TB’s and five destroyers; both mined, laid by UC.11 (Walter Gottfried Schmidt) two days earlier (H/J/tn - torpedoed):

TB.12, ex-Moth, Lt Edward Bulteel, near the Sunk LV at 1530 when there was a large explosion under her bows, believed torpedoed at the time. Stayed afloat as other TB's came to her rescue, crew abandoned her when TB.10 came alongside, taken in tow, but now TB.10 suffered an explosion and sank. Trawler took over the tow of TB.12, assisted by destroyer Cynthia, progressed slowly while the TB gradually settled, sinking at 1055 (presumably on the 11th) in 51.44.40N 01.26E. Lt Bulteel and 22 ratings lost.

TB.10, ex-Greenfly, Lt-Cdr John McLeod RN. Alongside TB.12, trying to take her in tow, then believed torpedoed herself at 1610 and broke in half, the two halves rising vertically before sinking off the Sunk LV (He/un – confirmed mined); 22 ratings lost, one more DOW

ASMAN S 304832 HM TB NO 10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
BAILEY SM M/11615 HMTB NO 10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
BARLEY RC L/5448 HM TB NO10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
BETTS B 300553(CH) HMTB 10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
BRADFORD WJAD 217346 HM TB NO 10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
DYER EA M/36 HMTB NO 10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
EDWARDS H 306350 HMTB NO 10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
GILES F K/6836 HM TB 10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
HAZELWOOD AG 186125 HMTB NO 10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
HELMSLEY TH J/31626 HMTB NO 10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
LEEK W K/18526 HMTB NO 10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
MANSER B SS/110537 HMTB NO 10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
PETTETT EW 270650 HM TB NO 10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
PRUDENCE E 308788 HMTB 10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
RICHARDS FW K/3581 HMTB NO10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
SMITH VJ M/2197 HMTB NO 10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
SOUTHON WC 182983 HMTB NO 10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
STONER EE J/583 HMTB NO 10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
TAKEN WJ SS/110774 HMTB NO 10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
TOPHAM A 306065 HM TB NO 10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
TURNER CH 308654 HM TB NO 10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY
WEBBER EWL J/6671 HMTB NO 10 10/06/1915 ROYAL NAVY

BURR, JAMES WILLIAM. Rank: Wireless Operator. Service No: 193641(Ch.). Date of Death: 22/07/1915. Age: 33.
Regiment/Service: Royal Navy. H.M. Torpedo Boat "10"
Grave Reference: C. C. 474. Cemetery: ENFIELD (HERTFORD ROAD) CEMETERY
Additional Information: Son of Josiah and Caroline Burr, of 169, South St., Ponders End.

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James Osborne

9th August 2013

Kevin Regan:

Peter, noted.
You can best contact through Ninfield Local History Group when you have time to visit.
Regards, Kevin

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James Osborne

6th August 2013

Kevin Regan:

Peter,

Good to know you got the message.

Could I be cheeky and ask (if any of his work relates to Ninfield) could I have a photo for our Local History Group records?

If you go to the Ninfield Local History Group web page, you'll be able to email anything relevant to us.

Regards,

Kevin

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Old Books

4th August 2013

Kevin Regan:

Pam, It seems the Thomas family moved to Ninfield after the 1891 Census. In 1901 Census they were at Lower Street.
Name; Age; Year born; Occupation; Where Born
James W Thomas Head 34 about 1867 Labourer Wadhurst Sussex Mary A Thomas Wife 42 about 1859 Female Bexhill Sussex Althea E Thomas Daughter 6 about 1895 Female Ninfield Sussex Herbert W C Thomas Son 4 about 1897 Male Ninfield Sussex Mabel E Thomas Daughter 6 months about 1900 Female Ninfield Sussex
Jesse and Mary Deeprose and family were at 23 Marlpits in 1891 Census although wife is Hepzibah in 1901! Her sister Elizabeth Beale lived next door at Mill Corner in 1901.
A brother, Henry and wife Eliza were nearby, on the Hailsham Road (A269). 70 year old Caroline lived in Lower Street with son George and daughter (in law?) Eliza (again). A Harriet E was a servant at Little Park. No Thomas family in 1901. No Campbell in either 1891 or 1901.
(hard to see formatting in this little letter box, but hope it makes sense).

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James Osborne

1st August 2013

Kevin Regan:

Googled this info for you:

James Thomas Armour Osborne Born 13 Jan 1907 – died 1979 Thurrock, Essex area.

Born in Sussex, the son of a Scots farmer who had moved South. He spent much of his early life in the countryside of his parents’ farm, (Ingrams Farm, Ninfield) watching and sketching wildlife of every kind. Osborne studied at Hastings School of Art, from which he won a scholarship to the Sculpture School of the Royal College of Art. In the last term of his final year he switched to the Print School, then under the direction of Malcolm Osborne, and showed such talent that he won the Prix de Rome in engraving.

From 1932 he worked as a teacher in the Art department at Regent Street Polytechnic. He produced many early pencil sketches of farmyard scenes and horses at work and play. These were later used in his engravings and other print work. Until 1986 they had never been seen in public and yet are amongst his most creative works. Osborne was elected an ARE in 1946 and a Fellow in 1957. A founder member of the Society of Wildlife Artists.

You should get your collection catalogued and valued (if not already done!).

Regards,
Kevin

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The Ashbys

1st August 2013

Kevin Regan:

Message in a bottle finally reached shore ...

Sir James had a son James William Frederick Walter born about 1874, if you haven't already found that. Living in Bexhill 1911 Census.

Now whether that's your "Chips" I don't know!

(Looks like the transcriber couldn't read the florid "F" of the enumerator and came up with J!)

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Finding Old School Friends

1st August 2013

Kevin Regan:

Hi, Jim. Looks as though you're now in Canada so the school reunion on 19th October might be hard for you to make!

To keep on eye on village life, look for our website, Ninfield Local History Group and we'll pass any message on at the reunion.

Cheers!

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William Billenness - Preacher

1st August 2013

Kevin Regan:

Hi, a long time ago but you never know, someone might come and read this!

William Billinness (that's how it is in the records) non conformist minister died aged 85 and was buried in St Marys Churchyard on 8 January 1895. Presumably you already know that.

We also have records for Mercy, (Hollis Street cottages, aged 69 on 7 March 1912) Stephen (aged 75, similar address on 9 October 1928)and Hannah (address in Hastings, aged 90 on 13 December 1902) Billinness.

The records I have here only go to 1931.

If you need more, Google the Ninfield Local History Group.

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Ninfield Local History Group

1st August 2013

Kevin Regan:

I can see that there are quite a few "Ninfielders" scattered around, so perhaps we might be able to put you in touch with those still in the village who aren't on this Message Board?

I think this is a much underused access point, so at least you won't be sending messages in a bottle hoping to hear from someone!

We do have info on the Deeprose family, plus we are currently arranging a Reunion of ex School pupils from before the 1970's. That's on Saturday 19th October in the Memorial Hall for those who can easily get here.

You can easily Google our website or facebook links and we'll do our best to help put you in touch. If we don't know, we usually know someone who does!
Any memories or information about YOUR time in Ninfield, let us know.
Regards
Kevin

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James Burr

31st January 2013 / Posted on Rye message board

Kevin Regan:

His name is on the Rye Harbour Memorial of WW1 but I cannot find any CWGC casualty of that name with any proven link to Rye area.
Does anyone have information to help me track him down?
Thanks in advance.

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Rye Memorial - James Walter Mesher

31st January 2013 / Posted on Rye message board

Kevin Regan:

Alan, It's so long ago since you posted, but I'd be interested in the details about Walter Mesher and 122nd Battery.

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Family History

13th January 2013 / Posted on Rye message board

Kevin Regan:

I never doubt family lore as having some semblance to the truth. I would have thought that he was part of an RAF Squadron ground crew based in France and caught up in the evacuation from Dunkirk. Without a Squadron number, it's difficult to see him as a member of an aircraft crew, but if you have further details, that may help you fit him in to your family memory.

The Abukir seems a very small ship to expend 4 torpedoes on, just the one was enough to sink her almost instantly.

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Whiteman Family

12th January 2013 / Posted on Rye message board

Kevin Regan:

Peter, I found some more information regarding the death of Albert Percy Whiteman during the Dunkirk evacuation. I was a bit puzzled as to how ground crew might be on the Memorial at Runnymede for those (mainly aircrew) with no known graves.
I've recently had a chap in the Balloon Section at Dover who was also on Runnymede, at first thought he might have been blown off shore hanging on to the balloon cable, but turned out he was in an Air Sea Rescue Launch attacked by German fighters during the attack on Dieppe in 1942.
Your Albert died about the SS Abukir, torpedoed by a German Schnellboot:-
WHITEMAN, ALBERT PERCY. Rank: Leading Aircraftman. Service No: 334948.
Date of Death: 28/05/1940. Age: 42. Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force.
Panel Reference: Panel 24. Memorial: RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL
Additional Information: Son of Mr. and Mrs. G. Whiteman, of Broad Oak, Rye, Sussex; husband of Edna May Whiteman, of Hastings, Sussex.
One of 32 RAF aircraftmen who drowned on "SS Abukir" (694 tons) when it was sunk by an E boat 8 miles off Ostend. The Egyptian ship Abukir operated by the Khedivial Mail Line (KML) came under British flag early in the Second World War and was managed by the General Steam Navigation Co. She was torpedoed and sunk by the German motor torpedo boat S-34 on May 28th, 1940, in the North Sea.
On the night of May 28 to 29 the British lost two transport ships: the Thuringia and the Abukir. Abukir left Ostend where it had evacuated 210 British troops and RAF servicemen, and an unknown number of Belgian Air Force personnel and British nuns from a convent near Brugges to cross to England. It was sunk by the Schnellboot S-34 under the command of Oblt.z S. Obermaier.
The attack began a few miles off the WESTHINDER buoy, three torpedoes were fired by the Schnellboot which missed the Abukir, but the 4th was struck and she sank in a few minutes. There were only 32 survivors including the captain (R M Wolfenden) and two nuns rescued by HMS Jaguar, Codrington, Javelin and Grenade (sunk next day at Dunkirk Harbour whilst evacuating more BEF troops) after some 7 hours in the sea.
S34 was sunk in the Mediterranean on 17 May 1942 when a direct hit from the Malta batteries at Fort St Leonard forced the crew to abandon her and an Me109 was called to sink her to prevent her falling into Allied hands.

Hope that it is of some interest!

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Whiteman Family

30th December 2012 / Posted on Rye message board

Kevin Regan:

Pleased to have been of some help! Are any of the Whiteman's I listed related?
HNY, Kevin

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Rye Bay Trawler Incident

28th December 2012 / Posted on Rye message board

Kevin Regan:

This was 6 years ago, so maybe you have the answer but if not ...
The details I have are:

Trawler Margaret Colebrook, 54 grt, 17 December 1916, Between Hastings and Dungeness, mined and sunk, 6 lives lost including Skipper Foord, William John, Son of William John Foord; husband of Elizabeth S. Foord, of 25, Mann St., Hastings. On 17th December 1916 the steam trawler "Margaret Colebrooke" was blown up by a mine just off the Sussex coast. Six of the seven crew died in the sinking, they were J. Foord (Master), George Thomas Boreham, William Eldridge, John Hilder, James Hilder and Alfred Martin. Thomas Henry Apps, serving onboard as an apprentice, survived. A memorial cross at Rye Cemetery records this disaster, and was financed and erected by the masters and crew of Margaret's fellow steam trawlers "Kent Colebrooke" and "Alfred Colebrooke". All of the deceased from this tragedy are also remembered on the War Memorial at Rye Church. At the central entrance to the upper part of Rye cemetery, there is a memorial to the crew of the Margaret, it was erected to their memory by the masters and crew of the steam trawlers Kent Colebrook and Alfred Colebrook, the vessel was owned by Alderman William E Colebrooke.
George Thomas (Sinbad) was a Master Mariner, the nickname obviously refers to "Sinbad" the sailor and sadly another to be claimed by the sea.
1901 Census Master of the fishing Boat Daisy (O.N. 75407) RX90 with 3 crew. Richard Harvey, Mate 24, Henry Swaine, 3rd Hand, aged 35 and James F Buley, aged 54, 4th hand. George Thomas owned 32 shares of the Daisy RX90 and George William (his father) the other 32 shares. The boat was built by James Collins Hoad in 1881 and the registry closed in 1910 when the boat was broken up. 1901 living at 22 South Undercliff Rye Sussex. George married Edith and they had five children. In 1909 they were living at Bartletts Buildings Rye.

On 17th December 1916, the steam trawler "Margaret Colebrooke" was blown up by a mine. Lost J. Foord (Master), George Thomas Boreham, William Eldridge, James Hilder, John Hilder and Alfred Martin. Thomas Apps serving as a boy survived. A memorial cross erected by the masters and crew of the steam trawlers "Kent Colebrooke" and "Alfred Colebrooke" now stands in Rye Cemetery. All the crew lost are remembered on the War memorial to all those who gave their lives in the Great War 1914 -1918 at Rye Church.
The family gravestone in Rye Cemetery reads-
"George Thomas Boreham, Beloved husband E.A. Boreham who died 17th.December 1916 aged 51, also Albert Charles, their son died 28th April 1916 aged 15 years, also Catherine Beatrice, their daughter and beloved wife of PC Betteridge, who died 15th. July 1945 aged 47 years. Also in loving memory of our dear mother Edith Annie Boreham who passed. away 22nd September 1954 aged 88 years"
The Alfred Colebrook was lost in WW2. September 9 1940 - Drifter Alfred Colebrook (56t, 1912), sunk as blockship, Richborough Channel, SE England.

The CWGC doesn't list any H Foord lost at sea, so doesn't appear he was a war related casualty

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Family History of Foord

28th December 2012 / Posted on Rye message board

Kevin Regan:

Jason, I've only just joined this forum and your message was LOOOOONG ago ... but since retiring to the country I now live in Ninfield and doing research on local War Memorials for various RBL Branches. I'm currently working on expanding that for Rye, hence joining the forum ...

I don't know if you've developed your Family Tree in the last 6 years but you might not be aware that William Foord was one of 6 killed in 1916 when the trawler Margaret (Colebrook) struck a mine.

FOORD William John Skipper, H.M. Trawler “Margaret” (Rye), Mercantile Marine Lost when the trawler struck a mine in Rye Bay 17 December 1916. Aged 40. Son of Mr & Mrs William John Foord Husband of Mrs Elizabeth Foord of 25, Mann Street, Hastings.

Commemorated on Tower Hill Memorial, London.

Trawler Margaret Colebrook, 54 grt, 17 December 1916, Between Hastings and Dungeness, mined and sunk, 6 lives lost including Skipper Foord, William John, Son of William John Foord; husband of Elizabeth S. Foord, of 25, Mann St., Hastings. On 17th December 1916 the steam trawler "Margaret Colebrooke" was blown up by a mine just off the Sussex coast. Six of the seven crew died in the sinking, they were J. Foord (Master), George Thomas Boreham, William Eldridge, John Hilder, James Hilder and Alfred Martin. Thomas Henry Apps, serving onboard as an apprentice, survived. A memorial cross at Rye Cemetery records this disaster, and was financed and erected by the masters and crew of Margaret's fellow steam trawlers "Kent Colebrooke" and "Alfred Colebrooke". All of the deceased from this tragedy are also remembered on the War Memorial at Rye Church. At the central entrance to the upper part of Rye cemetery, there is a memorial to the crew of the Margaret, it was erected to their memory by the masters and crew of the steam trawlers Kent Colebrook and Alfred Colebrook, the vessel was owned by Alderman William E Colebrooke.

George Thomas (Sinbad) was a Master Mariner, the nickname obviously refers to "Sinbad" the sailor and sadly another to be claimed by the sea.
1901 Census Master of the fishing Boat Daisy (O.N. 75407) RX90 with 3 crew. Richard Harvey, Mate 24, Henry Swaine, 3rd Hand, aged 35 and James F Buley, aged 54, 4th hand. George Thomas owned 32 shares of the Daisy RX90 and George William (his father) the other 32 shares. The boat was built by James Collins Hoad in 1881 and the registry closed in 1910 when the boat was broken up. 1901 living at 22 South Undercliff Rye Sussex. George married Edith and they had five children. In 1909 they were living at Bartletts Buildings Rye.

On 17th December 1916, the steam trawler "Margaret Colebrooke" was blown up by a mine. Lost J. Foord (Master), George Thomas Boreham, William Eldridge, James Hilder, John Hilder and Alfred Martin. Thomas Apps serving as a boy survived. A memorial cross erected by the masters and crew of the steam trawlers "Kent Colebrooke" and "Alfred Colebrooke" now stands in Rye Cemetery. All the crew lost are remembered on the War memorial to all those who gave their lives in the Great War 1914 -1918 at Rye Church.
The family gravestone in Rye Cemetery reads-
"George Thomas Boreham, Beloved husband E.A. Boreham who died 17th.December 1916 aged 51, also Albert Charles, their son died 28th April 1916 aged 15 years, also Catherine Beatrice, their daughter and beloved wife of PC Betteridge, who died 15th. July 1945 aged 47 years. Also in loving memory of our dear mother Edith Annie Boreham who passed. away 22nd September 1954 aged 88 years"
The Alfred Colebrook was lost in WW2. September 9 1940 - Drifter Alfred Colebrook (56t, 1912), sunk as blockship, Richborough Channel, SE England.

Hope that fires up your enthusiasm again for Family History hunting.
Should you want to ask about Ninfield, contact me at kevin.regan3ATsky.com (replacing the AT of course!)

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Whiteman Family

28th December 2012 / Posted on Rye message board

Kevin Regan:

Hi Peter,

The Whiteman family lost another member in Round Two:-

WHITEMAN, ALBERT PERCY. Rank: Leading Aircraftman
Service No: 334948. Date of Death: 28/05/1940. Age: 42. Regiment/Service: Royal Air Force
Panel Reference: Panel 24. Memorial: RUNNYMEDE MEMORIAL
Additional Information: Son of Mr. and Mrs. G. Whiteman, of Broad Oak, Rye, Sussex; husband of Edna May Whiteman, of Hastings, Sussex.
.. so now you need to find the link between James and G Whiteman....

Of course, if your Tree has a branch in Hove then you've another...
WHITEMAN, MONTAGUE AMBROSE. Rank: Corporal. Service No: 1825. Date of Death: 06/03/1917. Age: 28
Regiment/Service: Australian Infantry, A.I.F. 25th Bn.
Grave Reference: III. A. 10. Cemetery: ADANAC MILITARY CEMETERY, MIRAUMONT
Additional Information: Son of Elizabeth Whiteman, of 46, Sackville Rd., Hove, Sussex, England, and the late William Whiteman.

The 7th Battalion was the first Service Battalion of Lord Kitchener's New Army to be formed in the Royal Sussex Regiment, and indeed one of the very first in the whole of Kitchener's Army. It began recruiting at Chichester on 12th August 1914 when,

"... the scene for the following fortnight almost baffles description. A depot filled beyond capacity with recruits and more arriving every few hours... all joyfully expecting to be immediately issued with rifle and bayonet and sent to France."

All the original recruits were given a 'G' prefix to their Regimental Number, which began at 1 to around 1200.
The 7th Battalion landed at Boulogne on 31st May/1st June 1915.

The Albert Communal Extension
Albert was held by French forces against the German advance on the Somme in September 1914. It passed into British hands in the summer of 1915; and the first fighting in July 1916, is known as the Battle of Albert, 1916. It was captured by the Germans on the 26th April 1918, and before its recapture by the 8th East Surreys on the following 22nd August (in the Battle of Albert, 1918,) it had been completely destroyed by artillery fire.

The Extension was used by fighting units and Field Ambulances from August 1915 to November 1916, and more particularly in and after September 1916, when Field Ambulances were concentrated at Albert. From November 1916, the 5th Casualty Clearing Station used it for two months. From March 1917, it was not used (except for four burials in March, 1918) until the end of August 1918, when Plot II was made by the 18th Division.
Battle of Albert. 1-13 Jul 1916, including the capture of Montauban, Mametz, Fricourt, Contalmaison and La Boisselle.

My guess is that James died on the first day of the Battle of Ovilliers and did not linger from wounds inflicted some days before, if that can be any comfort.

Furthermore, although the 7th Battalion landed in France at the beginning of June 1915, James's Medal Index Card shows that he actually was in France as a Lance Corporal well before that date, on 4th January, and thus just missed out on the 1914 Star, being entitled to the 1914-15 Star as L/Cpl and British War and Victory medals as a Private. Clearly he was a man they needed in a hurry, and good enough to deserve the appointment to Lance Corporal.

Hope that helps join the dots!

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